In-Home Care Community Grant

In-Home Care Incentive: Saving Money, Reducing Crime, Strengthening Families

 

 

In 2014, the Michigan Legislature provided a solution to safely reduce reliance of out‐of‐home placement—the In‐Home Community Care Grant.

 

 

Established by the Michigan Legislature in Fiscal Year 2014, the In-Home Community Care Grant provides an incentive for rural counties to save money by reducing out-of-home placements and reinvest cost-savings into highly effective community-based programs.

 

 

The $1 million grant, which is housed in the Department of Human Services budget, awards resources to rural counties for new community-based juvenile justice programs. As of March 2014, four counties have been awarded and additional proposals are being reviewed. Until now, these counties have had few community-based options, forcing them to rely only on out-of-home placement, even for low-risk offenders.

 

 

  • Cost savings – County grantees are required to track cost effectiveness and document any savings from reduced expenditures on out-of-home placements.

  • Outcome Tracking – The new projects all include evidence-based practices that are proven to reduce reoffending and effectively treat the needs of youth and families. Participating counties are required to track and report outcomes to the state.

 

 

Expanding the In‐Home Community Care Grant to $5 million could give larger counties a chance to improve their local juvenile justice services.

 

 

The Governor’s FY 2015 budget recommends continuing In-Home Community Care Grant for $1 million. A relatively small expansion of the Grant to $5 million – less than 2% of the Child Care Fund – could make a great impact to all Michigan counties, not just rural areas. If the program were to expand statewide, Michigan economists estimate a savings of up to $44 million in just one year!

 

Community-based juvenile justice programs cost less than out-of-home care, increase public safety, and improve youth and family well-being. Research shows that community-based programs show better public safety and youth development outcomes.  These programs are proven to be equally, if not more, effective at holding youth accountable and reducing recidivism, because of the rigor, intensity, and individualized treatment for youth and their families.

 

The In-Home Care Incentive is a competitive grant program meant to increase low-cost, highly effective community-based options for delinquent youth at the county level. 

 

 

  • Currently, the Child Care Fund (CCF), administered through the Michigan Department of Human Services (DHS), reimburses counties 50% of eligible expenditures for juvenile court programs that provide direct service to delinquent youth. The 50% reimbursement rate will prevail with the Incentive.

  • By qualifying for the Incentive grant, counties will receive an added reimbursement from the CCF for in-home care services and are required to track and report program outcomes.

  • Cost-neutrality is guaranteed.  As community-based, in-home care services are far less expensive than residential placement, the cost of the pilot project would be recouped within the first year through reduced out-of-home expenditures.

  • Cost savings for Michigan will occur by using effective, but less costly in-home care services.  Examples of Michigan counties include: Midland County with more than $1.6 million saved; Berrien County reduced costs per juvenile from $87,000 to $5,100.  Examples of such savings in other states include:  RECLAIM Ohio saved $11 to $45 in commitment costs by using community-based alternatives; and, since 2004, Redeploy Illinois saved $18.7 million.

 

 

Michigan courts, counties, public safety officials, and child advocates support boilerplate language in the FY 2014 state budget for the In-Home Care Incentive Grant

 

Media & Materials 

 

Legislative Materials:

 

Media:

  • Pat Shellenbarger, “Smart not tough: Reconsidering Juvenile Justice,” Bridge Magazine, February 21, 2012. Link to article.

  • George Hunter, “‘We can’t arrest our way out’ of youth violence issue, Detroit police chief says,” The Detroit News, April 24, 2012. Link to article.

  • John Barnes, “Push to close Michigan’s three juvenile reformatories sparks debate: Safety versus savings?” MLive.com, May 9, 2012. Link to article.

  • Jeff Gerritt, Editorial, “In-home care grants help youths and budgets,” The Detroit Free Press, May 14, 2012. Link to article.

  • Benny Napoleon, David Leyton, Catherine Garcia-Lindstrom, & Gerald Cliff, Guest Commentary, “Save money and cut crime by investing in community programs to reform youths,” The Detroit Free Press, May 15, 2012. Link to article.

National Resources:

  • Improving the Effectiveness of Juvenile Justice Programs: A New Perspective on Evidence-Based Practice, Lipsey, et al. (2010). Link to resource.

  • No Place for Kids: The Case for Reducing Juvenile Incarceration, Annie E. Casey Foundation (2011). Link to resource.

  • Evidence-Based Public Policy Options to Reduce Future Prison Construction, Criminal Justice Costs, and Crime Rates, Aos, et al. (2006). Link to resource.

  • Resolution, Reinvestment & Realignment: Three Strategies for Changing Juvenile Justice, Butts, et al. (2011). Link to resource.

 

Learn more:

 

 

Legislative Materials:

 

Media

  • Pat Shellenbarger, “Smart not tough: Reconsidering Juvenile Justice,” Bridge Magazine, February 21, 2012. Link to article.

  • George Hunter, “‘We can’t arrest our way out’ of youth violence issue, Detroit police chief says,” The Detroit News, April 24, 2012. Link to article.

  • Jennifer A. Bowen, “Redeploy Illinois program helps juvenile offenders stay out of jail,” BND.com, May 2, 2012. Link to article.

  • John Barnes, “Push to close Michigan’s three juvenile reformatories sparks debate: Safety versus savings?” MLive.com, May 9, 2012. Link to article.

  • Jeff Gerritt, Editorial, “In-home care grants help youths and budgets,” The Detroit Free Press, May 14, 2012. Link to article.

  • Benny Napoleon, David Leyton, Catherine Garcia-Lindstrom, & Gerald Cliff, Guest Commentary, “Save money and cut crime by investing in community programs to reform youths,” The Detroit Free Press, May 15, 2012. Link to article.

 

National Resources

  • Improving the Effectiveness of Juvenile Justice Programs: A New Perspective on Evidence-Based Practice, Lipsey, et al. (2010). Link to resource.

  • No Place for Kids: The Case for Reducing Juvenile Incarceration, Annie E. Casey Foundation (2011). Link to resource.

  • Evidence-Based Public Policy Options to Reduce Future Prison Construction, Criminal Justice Costs, and Crime Rates, Aos, et al. (2006). Link to resource.

  • Resolution, Reinvestment & Realignment: Three Strategies for Changing Juvenile Justice, Butts, et al. (2011). Link to resource.

 

 

Supporters:

Michigan Council on Crime and Delinquency


Michigan Association of Counties


Michigan Association for Family Court Administration


Fight Crime: Invest in Kids Michigan


Crossroads Bible Institute


Michigan Association of United Ways


Michigan County Social Services Association, Child and Family Committee


TrueNorth Community Services


Wayne County Department of Child and Family Services


Over 25 individual Michigan circuit and probate courts

 

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